Letters of Recommendation

Obtaining Strong Letters of Recommendation

Most health professions schools will require at least three letters of recommendation. Many mandate that two of those letters be from science faculty. This can be tricky at UC Davis, where most science courses contain hundreds of students. Regardless, this is what you have to achieve, so if you are serious about going to professional school, you will need to find ways to work with faculty or PIs.

The best letters say something about you as a person. Take a look at what the AAMC offers as advice to letter writers. Schools want to see more than "This student scored an A in my class." This means that you, as a current student, have to begin from day one building relationships with those around you. The more outgoing and persistent you are, the more likely you will find someone who will respond to you. This does not mean be inappropriate or obnoxious about your persuit for a letter, but rather, find individuals to mentor you in this process who could potentially serve the role as a letter writer down the road.

Here are some tips for asking for a LOR:

 

Before

When you have chosen individuals to ask for a letter, begin by drafting a very professional, highly edited email asking for a meeting. You should speak with your letter writers in person or on the phone when asking. Before your meeting, put a packet together containing the following:

  1. Typed directions for submitting letter. (Website, email, steps, early due date)
  2. A description of your plans with dates (Check here to learn when your application season opens.)
  3. Application Essay/Personal Statement (Learn More)
  4. Resume
  5. Transcripts and Scores
  6. Suggestions for the writer! It is very useful, as a writer, to receive a reminder along the following lines: "Professor Keyes, your letter will be the one that best illustrates my analytical ability, my promptness in completing projects, and my reasons for wanting to pursue PA school next fall. Remember that you gave me an A– in Chemistry two years ago and it was your suggestion that led to my summer at X Research Lab."

We want you to possess the highest level of professionalism when interacting with letter writers. You will receive a stronger letter the better you present yourself during this process. 

 

During

When you show up to your appointment on time, be dressed slightly nicer than you would on an average day.

Shake their hand and thank them again for their time.

Tell them what you plan to do (ex. Apply to dental school this June).

Look at them and ask, "Would you be willing to write a strong letter of recommendation to support my application?" Pay attention to their response! You are asking for a positive letter, not just any letter. You do not need an average or weak letter. If that person behaves in any way to suggest that he/she cannot write a positive letter, let that person know that you will not be needing their help with this part of the process. If you have any doubt in your mind about that person's feelings about you, you should probably think about other options.

 If your meeting goes well, you may be asked to answer additional questions or provide additional documents.

 

After

Soon after the meeting, you should send a well-written email thanking them for their time and offer to write a letter. Include any additional information they requested about you. Be sure to mention the deadline and offer to answer any further questions.

If the deadline is a week away and you haven't heard anything back, you can send another well-written email thanking them again and reminding them how to submit the letter. If the deadline has passed and you haven't heard anything, send another email thanking them and asking if they will be able to submit by a given date. Offer that if they cannot, it is fine but if they could let you know, you would greatly appreciate it.

 

Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Faculty Advice on Asking for LOR

Look for mentors, not letter writers.

Be genuinely interested in those you seek as mentors.

Be humble and gracious.

Research the person you approach. Know their research, publications, and tenure at UCD.